Tuesday, July 7, 2020

A Critique of Fahrenheit 451 Critique - 825 Words

A Critique of Fahrenheit 451 (Article Critique Sample) Content: Name:Course Title:Supervisor:Date:A Critique of Fahrenheit 451Fahrenheit 451, first published in 1953, is a novel by Ray Bradbury describes a futuristic society in which books are outlawed. The main theme of the novel is censorship and forced conformity on the people living in the society. Books are forbidden. In any case the book is found in the society, it is burned and its owner arrested. The title of the book symbolizes the temperature at which the paper of a book catches fire. The book was transcribed in the era of McCarthyism. During this period, Americans were wrongly accused of destabilizing the government of the United States of America. It was also a period of cold war and television was the major form of mass communication. The book tackles the leveling effect of consumerism and reductionism. It portrayed how political deals and advertising industry destroyed human individuality and creativity. The book is a work of fiction. The poetic distinction of the a uthor as well as his application of an alien world and visionary technology is clearly portrayed in this piece of literature. This essay makes a critical analysis of Fahrenheit 451.Summary of Fahrenheit 451Fahrenheit 451 highlights a series of events in a fictitious futuristic society. The story focuses on the spiritual and emotional development of Guy Montag, who is a fireman of the 24th century. Contrary to the normal fireman, the fireman in Fahrenheit 451 plays the responsibility of starting a fire instead of extinguishing it. The government carries out the mandate of seeking out, and eradicating books since it is against the law of the land to possess a book. The book portrays a world where owning a book is a capital crime that can only be punished by death. Montag together with his colleagues have been mandated to enforce the government regulation of eradicating books. This team has the authority to burn homes that are suspected of having books. These brutal acts together with other unfortunate events make Montag to become disillusioned, and he quits his profession (Bloom 7).Surprisingly, Montag reforms though he was the main culprit in the burning of books. One specific incident that had a great effect on changing the character of Montag is his interaction with a teenage called by the name Clarisse McClellan whose childlike mannerism initiates a state of consciousness in Montag. The suicidal attempt of Montag's wife as well as a reflection on their sterile relationship and the molestation of a woman who refused to surrender her books also contributed to the sudden change in the life of Montag. The chief of the firemen, Beaty, clearly explains the role of the burning mission in the society after it was apparent that Montag was in extreme despair following the violent death of Clarisse (Bradbury 163).Critical analysisFahrenheit 451 clearly brings out the concept of censorship. According to this book, it was illegal to read and own a book. Books were openly burned, and their owners condemned to death. The books showcase a future society that uses firemen to destroy the book with the aim of discouraging the society from reading books. Censorship is the main theme presented in Fahrenheit 451. The impact of censorship is demonstrated by behavior, thought and submission. Since people often tend to act as their peers in various ways, censorship in appearance has become a dominant form of submission in the current world. In the novel, the firemen have a slogan to go along with their routine of burning books (Bradbury 8). It was against the law in the society to read books. Although Montag had read the books that he burnt, he told Clarisse that it was against the law to read the books. Just like Montag, many people often try to conform to the standards of the society. The novel portrays behavior as a negative form of submission in the current society. Talented and gifted people are prevented from excelling since they are not allowed to expr ess their abilities.The novel clearly shows how the government can prevent the success of its people by limiting their access to information that might be important for their development. Preventing people from reading is a way of preventing them from thinking. When people are allowed to read books they would start to question the way the government is governing them and prevent it from controlling them like puppets (Bloom 13).The novel shows a futuristic society where submission of thought is highly valued. There is a battle of having personal freedom. The book portrays the impact of denying men the opportunity to express their thoughts or remember their past. Although Clarisse was an intelligent girl, she was not allowed to express herself. She only confided in Montag because she considered him to be unique unlike other firemen who would not lend her an ear (Br...

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Direct Proportion Definition

Definition: Direct proportion is the relationship between two variables when their ratio is equal to a constant value. Examples: The volume of an ideal gas is directly proportional to the absolute temperature of the gas (Charles Law)If you get paid by the hour, the more you work the more you will get paid. If you earn $15/hour and work 2 hours, you will earn $30 (Not including taxes, etc.) and if you work 4 hours, you will earn $60. The ratio of money earned to hours worked is 15 to 1 or $15/hour.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Ford Motor Company Written Case Analysis - 2381 Words

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 2 2. Case Question 2-8 2.1 Define and discuss Fords business-level strategy. How can the companys value-chain activities be better linked to create value for the company? 2.2 How can Ford successfully position itself in terms of the five forces of competition? 2.3 In what ways can the company effectively manage customer relationships to increase strategic competitiveness? 2.4 What conditions and tools can facilitate Fords efforts to produce differentiated products at relatively low costs? Outline a rough competitor analysis. What can be learned about expected competitor behaviour by using the model of competitive rivalry to understand Fords†¦show more content†¦Ford has successfully in modern technologies that create value to consumers in design phase. They have started tailoring design models subsequent to public demand and this evident that Ford doing well in recent financial periods. Marketing is important to make value in the company. In order to increase sales, Ford has been working with dealers in creating better market strategies. Ford has teamed-up with SAP to enhance warehousing by using information technology to develop its value chain. Nevertheless, it has teamed-up with Daily Parts Advantage network for receiving spare parts to dealers. Their purpose in partnering was to obtain market recognition and lock partner with proficiency in t he automotive supply chain (Bowman,2004). Ford had reduced its supply chain cycle through implementation of information technologies. For instance, about 85% decline in consumers back orders lines. 2.2 Ford has successfully position itself in terms of the five forces of competition. The threat of entrants is low in Ford automobile industry. Ford manufacture is able to accomplish economies of scale in order to compete in automobile industry. Ford always has the strategy to react against the threat of new entrants by taking an inconceivable amount of capital to produce automobiles and research and development for creating more innovation products. Ford MotorShow MoreRelatedFirestone and Ford Case Analysis Essay1458 Words   |  6 PagesIssue II. Questions for Case analysis a. What are the ethical and social issues in this case? b. Who are the stakeholders and what are their stakes? How do legitimacy, power, and urgency factor in? Do these companies care about consumers? Discuss. c. Conduct a CSR analysis of both Firestone and Ford. How do they measure up in fulfilling their various social responsibilities? d. Who is at fault in the tire separation controversy? Bridgestone / Firestone? Ford Motor Company? The NHTSA? IIIRead MoreThe Ford Pinto Ethical Dilemma1442 Words   |  6 PagesThe Ford Pinto Ethical Dilemma Written by Learning Team B; C. Riley, F. Foster, K. Jankoski, M. Riner, amp; R. 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Retail Logistics Systems free essay sample

A paper which studies the logistics involved in retail establishments. This paper provides an overview of the logistics involved in 21st-century retail in a variety of different types of retail establishments. Because the realm of logistics is so large and so complicated, this paper focuses primarily on the distribution element of logistics although it touches on distribution networks in the overall system of retail logistics. The paper shows how companies now have a wide range of distribution networks and channels available to them as they attempt to match consumers with goods. It shows that some companies, including superstores like Wal-Mart, rely on complex centrally planned and located logistics systems to convey goods to customers while others rely primarily on the wonders of the Internet to structure their logistical problems. This paper examines only the retail market, or only those commercial activities involved in selling items directly to the consumer for personal use. We will write a custom essay sample on Retail Logistics Systems or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Transportation of retail goods is an arena that has been especially affected by globalization. We saw evidence of this last year when there were clashes between Mexican and American truck drivers, strict interpreters of NAFTA, and environmentalists. With lower standards for pollution allowed for Mexican trucks, many Americans did not want more of these trucks crossing the border into the United States for these trucks would bring both retail goods and smog with them.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Movie Summary The Karate Kid (1984) Essay Example

Movie Summary The Karate Kid (1984) Essay In 1984, when the movie The Karate Kid was first shown in theaters, there were no indications it would launch three sequels and a remake in 2010.The story of a young man relocated with a single mother and struggling to fit in is as common a theme then as it is now.As he tries to adjust to a school where he’s attracted to a young girl while being the brunt of a gang of bullies, he finds an unlikely mentor in the handyman of his apartment building who happens to be a master in karate.Director John G. Avildsen cast actors Ralph Macchio in the lead, Pat Morita as his martial arts instructor, and Elisabeth Shue as the love interest (IMDb, 2016).As the storyline unfolds, a deeper lesson is presented than triumph over adversity and good over bad.One of the signs of maturity is the ability to control emotions, and Daniel is on the brink of becoming a man.He experiences anxiety, insecurity, and even fear when faced with physical violence and wants the revenge of retaliation.However, Mr . Miyagi teaches him that it is more important to practice dedication and self-control than vengeance.Set in the early 1980s, The Karate Kid continues to be an example for young people trying to cope with adolescence in any era. At the time the movie was released, America was in the throes of economic depression and cultural change (Phipps, 2015).Madonna wanted you to â€Å"Open Your Heart,† Michael Jackson was â€Å"Bad,† and Bon Jovi was â€Å"Slippery When Wet.†Joe Montana dominated football; Mike Tyson ruled the boxing ring, and Larry Holmes squared off against Magic Johnson on the basketball court.Dallas, Dynasty, and The Cosby Show were the top television programs while kids played with Cabbage Patch Kids, Transformers, and Care Bears.Canada gained official independence from the United Kingdom in 1982, Ronald Reagan was President, hair was big, and clothing was bright.Homes started to have computers, VCRs, Walkman’s, and boom box We will write a custom essay sample on Movie Summary The Karate Kid (1984) specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Movie Summary The Karate Kid (1984) specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Movie Summary The Karate Kid (1984) specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer

Monday, March 16, 2020

Ways of Seeing Similarities in Point of View in Cathedral and A Conversation with My Father

Ways of Seeing Similarities in Point of View in Cathedral and A Conversation with My Father The short stories Cathedral by Raymond Carver and A Conversation with My Father by Grace Paley, while they differ in characterization, both employ a detached narrative point of view to create an emotional experience of profound isolation in the reader.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Ways of Seeing: Similarities in Point of View in Cathedral and A Conversation with My Father specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More In Carver’s (2006) story, we learn the emotional isolation experienced by the narrator almost immediately, through his description of his own wife’s attempted suicide, and his description of the death of Robert’s wife. Carver’s narrator maintains a cold distance from the emotional impact of having very nearly lost his wife before he met her. Carver’s narrator seems more engaged by the competition between himself and his wife’s first husband, as evidenced herein: â€Å"one night she got to feeling lonely and cut off from people she kept losing in that moving-around life. She got to feeling she couldnt go it another step. She went in and swallowed all the pills and capsules in the medicine chest†¦But instead of dying, she got sick. She threw up. Her officerwhy should he have a name? he was the childhood sweetheart, and what more does he want?† (Carver, 2006). As Bullock (1994) details, in the narrator’s account of his wifes attempted suicide, â€Å"the figures in the story- the wife, the officer, the blind man- seem a long distance away, tiny separated figures, observed by a detached, all-seeing eye. They might as well be figures on the screen of the television.† Similarly, when the narrator describes the loss of Beulah, Robert’s wife, he betrays an almost savage disregard for Robert’s emotions when he says, â€Å"Beulah’s health went into rapid decline. She died in a Seattle hospital room, the blind man sitting beside the bed and holding on to her hand. Theyd married, lived and worked together, slept togetherhad sex, sureand then the blind man had to bury her. All this without his having ever seen what the goddamned woman looked like. It was beyond my understanding† (Carver, 2006). Significantly, the narrator never names his wife. He identifies her only by role. This omission creates a distinct absence of personality in the woman. The narrator feels no real connection with her as a human being, aside from a mildly competitive instinct to assert his ownership over her body when she falls asleep and her robe opens in front of Robert. The point of view on display from Carver’s narrator reveals the vast emotional distance that exists between himself and other people, and he transmits and transfers this distance to us, the reader. The narrator feels nothing when describing intensely emotional events; he recounts them as though they were news.Advertising Looking for essay on comparative literature? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More As a result, the reader’s own emotional experience comes to resemble his: muted, and disengaged. Carver’s use of point of view allows us to perceive the world from the same standoffish, sharply critical distance that the narrator does, and ironically, this brings us closer to him. The narrator in Grace Paley’s (2006) A Conversation with My Father follows a different characterization than Carver’s, however, the point of view contains the same chilled â€Å"distance between observer and observed† (Bullock, 1994). Paley’s narrator initially appears more animated, more engaged, than Carver’s. An example occurs in the story’s opening when she expresses â€Å"I want to please him, though I dont remember writing that way. I would like to try to tell such a story, if he means the kind that begins: There was a wom an followed by plot, the absolute line between two points which Ive always despised. Not for literary reasons, but because it takes all hope away. Everyone, real or invented, deserves the open destiny of life† (Paley, 2006). Such passages suggest that Paley’s narrator might be more sympathetic to the plight of other humans than Carver’s narrator, and therefore, more capable of true human emotional empathy, however, when we look closer, we see that Paley’s narrator, like Carver’s, identifies her father exclusively by role. He is never named in the story. Also, Paley’s narrator betrays the same disparaging judgmental point of view as Carver’s when she says, â€Å"people start out fantastic, you think theyre extraordinary, but it turns out as the work goes along, theyre just average with a good education† (Paley, 2006). Critics such as Wilde delineate this story’s meaning via gender roles, and link gender to ways of seeing. Wilde (1987) explains that in A Conversation with My Father, â€Å"the paternal world – encoded in the fathers request that his daughter compose a simple story Just recognizable people and then write down what happened to them next –- bases itself on unexamined and peremptory powers of discernment and identification. Defensively but still smugly, it prescribes an impossibly simple, stable, and objective mirror to reflect what it takes to be the inevitable, sequential trajectory of lifes beginnings, middles, and ends.† However, the narrator herself displays the same critical, arm’s length point of view as Carver’s, which results in a similar isolating emotional experience in the reader. The way that the narrator tells the story of the neighbor across the street barely conceals her disapproval of the woman’s choices, as we see here: â€Å"Although she was often high herself, certain good mothering reflexes remained, and she saw to it that th ere was lots of orange juice around and honey and milk and vitamin pills.Advertising We will write a custom essay sample on Ways of Seeing: Similarities in Point of View in Cathedral and A Conversation with My Father specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More However, she never cooked anything but chili, and that no more than once a week. She explained, when we talked to her, seriously, with neighborly concern, that it was her part in the youth culture and she would rather be with the young, it was an honor, than with her own generation† (Paley, 2006). In this passage we see real similarities between the dismissal of emotion portrayed by the Carver narrator when describing the death of Robert’s wife and the near death of his own. Similarly, Paley’s narrator passes judgment on the neighbor woman’s motivations, as we see in this section: â€Å"In order to keep him from feeling guilty (because guilt is the stony heart of nine tenths of all clinically diagnosed cancers in America today, she said), and because she had always believed in giving bad habits room at home where one could keep an eye on them, she too became a junkie. Her kitchen was famous for a while a center for intellectual addicts who knew what they were doing† (Paley, 2006). There is a sarcastic and dismissive undertone to Paley’s narrator’s description, which echo’s Carver’s narrator description, as seen here: â€Å"She could, if she wanted, wear green eye-shadow around one eye, a straight pin in her nostril, yellow slacks, and purple shoes, no matter. And then to slip off into death, the blind mans hand on her hand, his blind eyes streaming tearsIm imagining nowher last thought maybe this: that he never even knew what she looked like, and she on an express to the grave. Robert was left with a small insurance policy and a half of a twenty-peso Mexican coin. The other half of the coin went into th e box with her. Pathetic† (Carver, 2006). Within Paley’s narrator’s description of her neighbor lies the same biting judgment and fault finding as Carver’s, and the same dismissal of emotional context as it pertains to action. The short stories Cathedral and A Conversation with My Father, at first glance, appear very different, not only because the narrators differ in gender, but also as the writing styles feel opposite. Carver’s voice remains minimalist and monotonous throughout, while Paley’s contains more tonal shifts and humor. However, upon closer inspection the reader sees that both narrators employ the same superior, cold, remote approach to human interaction, both pass harsh judgment on others, and both refer to those closest to them – Carver’s narrator’s wife, and Paley’s narrator’s father – exclusively by role and function, as opposed to by name. Both stories thus create an isolating emotion al experience on the page and in the reader.Advertising Looking for essay on comparative literature? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More References Bullock, C. J. (1994). From Castle to Cathedral: The Architecture of Masculinity in Raymond Carvers Cathedral. The Journal of Mens Studies, 4, 343-351. Carver, R. (2006). Cathedral. The Norton Introduction to Literature. A. Booth, J. P. Hunter, K. J. Mays (Eds.). New York: W. W. Norton Company. Paley, G. (2006). A Conversation with My Father. The Norton Introduction to Literature. A. Booth, J. P. Hunter, K. J. Mays (Eds.). New York: W. W. Norton Company. Wilde, A. (1987). Grace Paleys World-Inventing Words. Middle Grounds: Studies in Contemporary American Fiction. E. Elliot, (Ed.). Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Beloved on Slavery

This is true because most of the major events in the story relate to some type of slavery. The slavery that drives the novel does not have to be strictly physical slavery. Morrison†s characters are slaves physically and mentally. Although they are former slaves, they are forever trapped by horrible memories. The type of slavery the novel initially depicts does not correspond to what really happened to slaves in the 1800s. At Sweet Home, Mr. and Mrs. Garner treated their slaves like real people. Mr. Garner is proud of his slaves and treats them like men, not animals. . . . they were Sweet Home men — the ones Mr. Garner bragged about while other farmers shook their heads in warning at the phrase. [He said,] â€Å". . . my niggers is men every one of em. Bought em thataway, raised em thataway. Men every one. â€Å"1 The things that occurred at Sweet Home while Mr. Garner is alive are rather conservative compared to what slaves actually suffered during this time period. Under the management of schoolteacher, things change dramatically. He turns Sweet Home into a real slave plantation. He treats and refers to the slaves as animals. He is responsible for the horrible memories embedded in Sethe and Paul D. Sethe feels the impact of slavery to its fullest extent. Slavery pushes her to kill her baby daughter. She feels that is the only way to protect her beloved daughter from the pain and suffering she would endure if she became a slave. The minute she sees schoolteachers hat, Sethe†s first instinct is to protect her children. Knowing that slave catchers will do anything to bring back fugitive slaves and that dead slaves are not worth anything, Sethe took matters into her own hands. On page 164 Sethe says, â€Å"I stopped him. I took and put my babies where they†d be safe. † Paul D asks, â€Å"How? Your boys gone you don†t know where. One girl dead, the other won†t leave the yard. How did it work? â€Å"They ain†t at Sweet Home. Schoolteacher ain†t got em,† replies Sethe. This one incident does not only affect Sethe, but it changes things for Beloved and Denver as well. Beloved loses her life to slavery. Her own mother sacrifices her existence in order to keep her out of slavery. As for Denver, she is indirectly affected by the horrors of slavery. She has to put up with living in a haunted house because her mother refuses to run away again. On page 15 Sethe says, â€Å"I got a tree on my back and a haint in my house, and nothing in between but the daughter I am holding in my arms. No more running — from nothing. I will never run from another thing on this earth. † Sethe becomes a slave again when she realizes who Beloved really is. She feels indebted to Beloved for taking her life. In an effort to gain forgiveness, Sethe decides to focus all her energy on pleasing Beloved. When once or twice Sethe tried to assert herself — be the unquestioned mother whose word was law and who knew what was best — Beloved slammed things, wiped the table clean of plates, threw salt on the floor, broke a windowpane. †¦ Nobody said, You raise your hand to me and I will knock you into the middle of next week. †¦ No, no. They mended the plates, swept the salt, and little by little it dawned on Denver that if Sethe didn†t wake up one morning and pick up a knife, Beloved might. 2 Then there†s Paul D, who replaces his â€Å"red heart† with a tin tobacco box. He refuses to love anything strongly and establish long term relationships because he is still hurting from losing his brothers and friends to schoolteacher. Schoolteacher also takes his pride and manhood away by forcing him to wear a bit. Paul D compares himself to a chicken. On page 72 he says, â€Å"But wasn†t no way I†d ever be Paul D again, living or dead. Schoolteacherchanged me. I was something else and that something else was less than a chicken sitting in the sun on a tub. † As a member of the chain gang he suffers another type of slavery because he is both a prisoner and a sexual servant. Even after he escapes and is a free man, Paul D is still a slave. He is a slave to his memory. Having been through so many horrible events, he has trouble finding happiness again. In her novel, Morrison uses the phrase, â€Å"Freeing yourself was one thing; claiming ownership of that freed self was another. † This applies to each and every one of her characters. Sethe will always be haunted by the memory of killing her own flesh and blood. It will be a long time until Paul D is ready to turn his tin box back into a red heart. While Denver finally ventures out of 124, she is not going to forget being shunned by the community and being held captive by her own house. As for Beloved, she is her own slave. Her constant dependency on Sethe makes her weak. Beloved needs to free herself from Sethe. Though it is hard, she needs to accept what has happened and move on. Beloved is about a group of people and how they deal with life†s hardships. Many issues in the story deal with control. There is a constant struggle for power throughout the novel. Each character fights to free him/herself from something or someone. The major theme in the story is freedom and how to acquire it. The critics are correct in saying that the novel is primarily about slavery, but they should mention that slavery means more than just being an indentured servant. Beloved on Slavery This is true because most of the major events in the story relate to some type of slavery. The slavery that drives the novel does not have to be strictly physical slavery. Morrison†s characters are slaves physically and mentally. Although they are former slaves, they are forever trapped by horrible memories. The type of slavery the novel initially depicts does not correspond to what really happened to slaves in the 1800s. At Sweet Home, Mr. and Mrs. Garner treated their slaves like real people. Mr. Garner is proud of his slaves and treats them like men, not animals. . . . they were Sweet Home men — the ones Mr. Garner bragged about while other farmers shook their heads in warning at the phrase. [He said,] â€Å". . . my niggers is men every one of em. Bought em thataway, raised em thataway. Men every one. â€Å"1 The things that occurred at Sweet Home while Mr. Garner is alive are rather conservative compared to what slaves actually suffered during this time period. Under the management of schoolteacher, things change dramatically. He turns Sweet Home into a real slave plantation. He treats and refers to the slaves as animals. He is responsible for the horrible memories embedded in Sethe and Paul D. Sethe feels the impact of slavery to its fullest extent. Slavery pushes her to kill her baby daughter. She feels that is the only way to protect her beloved daughter from the pain and suffering she would endure if she became a slave. The minute she sees schoolteachers hat, Sethe†s first instinct is to protect her children. Knowing that slave catchers will do anything to bring back fugitive slaves and that dead slaves are not worth anything, Sethe took matters into her own hands. On page 164 Sethe says, â€Å"I stopped him. I took and put my babies where they†d be safe. † Paul D asks, â€Å"How? Your boys gone you don†t know where. One girl dead, the other won†t leave the yard. How did it work? â€Å"They ain†t at Sweet Home. Schoolteacher ain†t got em,† replies Sethe. This one incident does not only affect Sethe, but it changes things for Beloved and Denver as well. Beloved loses her life to slavery. Her own mother sacrifices her existence in order to keep her out of slavery. As for Denver, she is indirectly affected by the horrors of slavery. She has to put up with living in a haunted house because her mother refuses to run away again. On page 15 Sethe says, â€Å"I got a tree on my back and a haint in my house, and nothing in between but the daughter I am holding in my arms. No more running — from nothing. I will never run from another thing on this earth. † Sethe becomes a slave again when she realizes who Beloved really is. She feels indebted to Beloved for taking her life. In an effort to gain forgiveness, Sethe decides to focus all her energy on pleasing Beloved. When once or twice Sethe tried to assert herself — be the unquestioned mother whose word was law and who knew what was best — Beloved slammed things, wiped the table clean of plates, threw salt on the floor, broke a windowpane. †¦ Nobody said, You raise your hand to me and I will knock you into the middle of next week. †¦ No, no. They mended the plates, swept the salt, and little by little it dawned on Denver that if Sethe didn†t wake up one morning and pick up a knife, Beloved might. 2 Then there†s Paul D, who replaces his â€Å"red heart† with a tin tobacco box. He refuses to love anything strongly and establish long term relationships because he is still hurting from losing his brothers and friends to schoolteacher. Schoolteacher also takes his pride and manhood away by forcing him to wear a bit. Paul D compares himself to a chicken. On page 72 he says, â€Å"But wasn†t no way I†d ever be Paul D again, living or dead. Schoolteacherchanged me. I was something else and that something else was less than a chicken sitting in the sun on a tub. † As a member of the chain gang he suffers another type of slavery because he is both a prisoner and a sexual servant. Even after he escapes and is a free man, Paul D is still a slave. He is a slave to his memory. Having been through so many horrible events, he has trouble finding happiness again. In her novel, Morrison uses the phrase, â€Å"Freeing yourself was one thing; claiming ownership of that freed self was another. † This applies to each and every one of her characters. Sethe will always be haunted by the memory of killing her own flesh and blood. It will be a long time until Paul D is ready to turn his tin box back into a red heart. While Denver finally ventures out of 124, she is not going to forget being shunned by the community and being held captive by her own house. As for Beloved, she is her own slave. Her constant dependency on Sethe makes her weak. Beloved needs to free herself from Sethe. Though it is hard, she needs to accept what has happened and move on. Beloved is about a group of people and how they deal with life†s hardships. Many issues in the story deal with control. There is a constant struggle for power throughout the novel. Each character fights to free him/herself from something or someone. The major theme in the story is freedom and how to acquire it. The critics are correct in saying that the novel is primarily about slavery, but they should mention that slavery means more than just being an indentured servant.